Archive for the ‘JoB likes’ Category

JoB likes: CROCHET (penis key rings, used tampons, pastel burkas)

February 9, 2011

“My transition from 2 to 3 dimensions was making a crochet penis that I now use as a key ring.”

And… “Islamic fundamentalists don’t approve the range of colors used in my burkas.”

Also… “I’m not a street artist… I consider myself a warming table artist.”

Watch the artist interview below for more priceless quotes and laugh-out-loud moments. I really, really want to start crocheting now!

Have you crocheted before? What did you make?

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JoB likes: CONTEMPORARY ART THAT GETS PEOPLE READING AGAIN

January 8, 2011

A metal artist and good friend of mine – Esther (廖幸玲), who lives here in Taichung – has signed up for a competition created by a big Taiwanese book publisher. The company has asked people to submit an innovative idea which will inspire people to start reading very old Chinese classics. My friend has an amazing idea and has been accepted into the voting stage. So now she needs your vote to win!

Actually, the idea reminded me a bit of Singaporean artist Michael Lee’s book sculptures.

'Every Architecture is a Banana', 2008, book sculpture, found book, 42 x 29.7 x 15 cm. Edition of 1 Collection of the artist. Image from michaellee.sg.

'Every Architecture is a Banana', 2008, book sculpture, found book, 42 x 29.7 x 15 cm. Edition of 1 Collection of the artist. Image from michaellee.sg.

Here’s a bit about her proposal from the artist herself:

In my proposal, I wrote out an idea related to a book called “Dream of the Red Chamber” (紅樓夢) which is one of the top five Chinese literature classics. It’s about the ups and downs of a super big family and is set around 300 years ago. Over 300 figures appear in the book and there are lots and lots of superb and beautiful words and poems as well as an amazing descrition of how people lived at that time. It also presents a comparison between the poor and the rich, the higher, lower and lowest classes, love and hate, dream and realities, the powerful and the weak…

However, such a book has been dying in the readers’ market as the language is too hard for most people to read and understand. So I want to try my best to tell the story in a way people would understand – using modern language, metal work and other media. I would like to create a pop-out story book to give back to the world the beauty of this old classic and hopefully evoke some further discussion and sharing of it and interest in it.

At the moment I am at the second reviewing stage, trying to get into the final ten. To give me a better chance at getting there I need lots and lots (and lots!) of votes from Internet supporters. It would be highly appreciated if you could give me a vote by clicking on the link below. You can even vote more than once by voting from different computers because the voting system works by recording your IP address. It would be 3009% appreciated if you could spread the news to other people for me as well.

Go on… vote!

Click here to vote and show your support for Esther, reading and art. The page is in Chinese, so once you click through, you will see Esther’s name, (廖幸玲), and a number which shows the number of votes she has already. Just above the number you will see a little blue rectangle with the words “投他一票”. Simply click on the blue rectangle to show your support and record your vote.

As Ether herself says, “Thank you soooooooooooooooo much for your kind patience of reading this mail. And I would like to thank you for all the effort and care you have given me on this matter.”

Esther currently trains with and works part-time for Taichung-based metalwork studio Zamama. I wrote about them in them and the other inhabitants of Stock 20 in the winter issues of GuanXi.

Important update! Voting ends this Friday, 15 January, 2010.

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JoB likes: HAND-MADE WEDDINGS

September 12, 2010

My fiance and I recently spent about five hours hand-crafting a large number of invites to give out to our guests for our slightly off-beat Taiwanese wedding. (We are both New Zealanders but are getting married here in Taichung.)

I’ve written up a how-to after the pics and will post on how we organised our (very) low-budget event after it’s all over. Only two weeks to go!

The first stage - stamping 40 or so pieces of cardboard.

Production line crafting - stamping 40 or so pieces of cardboard. There were a couple more colors - maroon, green, yellow.

Next: hand-stamping 40 or so brown envelopes.

Next: hand-stamping 40 or so brown envelopes.

The stamps - bought from a shop in Chung Yo department store here in Taichung.

The stamps - bought from a shop in Chung Yo department store here in Taichung.

The finished product. 1: invite card with party details. 2: Cat Lair business card, map to Cat Lair and drink card attached together with wool.

The finished product. 1: invite card with party details. 2: Cat Lair business card, map to Cat Lair and drink card tied together with wool.

Here’s how:

1. Buy two contrasting kinds of cardboard. We used corrugated cardboard as the backing card and a lighter polka dot card as the base card. You’ll also need some plain white heavy printer paper to print out the event details. While you’re at the stationers’/craft shop pick up some double-sided tape dispensers (better than glue because it doesn’t set all lumpy), some wool or string, a fine black marker or two, some rubber stamps, stamp ink in black, a craft knife, a cutting board, a strong ruler, some large-sized envelopes and a hole punch.

2. Measure and cut all the card to the size you want it. Remember that the base card needs to be a bit smaller than the backing card so it will fit inside it.

3. Stamp the base card with your chosen stamp and attach with double-sided tape to the backing card.

4. Type out the party details and print onto heavy white printer paper. Cut these out and attach with the tape to the cardboard. While you on the computer make a Google (or other) map to the venue and print this out on the heavy paper. Cut it out also. We needed to make a drink card for our wedding so we created and printed that at the same time.

5. We used some of the card leftover from the invite to make the “dog tags”. It was already cut to size. Just attach the map to some and any other materials you need to include to the rest. We included a business card from the venue in this set. Hole punch a corner of each card and then tie them all together with the string or wool.

6. Stamp all the envelopes with a stamp of your choice. We then typed and printed out addresses/names of guests and sender addresses onto the heavy white printer paper. We cut these out and attached them to the envelopes with the tape.

Notes: It’s a good idea to create a dummy copy of the invite before you go out and buy a whole lot of unnecessary stuff that you won’t use. Oh, and buy tons of tape – it goes really fast.

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JoB likes: ENTHRALLING INTERVIEWS WITH RENOWNED ARTISTS

July 18, 2010

My interview with Taiwanese artist Tsong Pu was enthralling and a great start to my exploration of the Taiwanese contemporary art industry.

On Friday, I was privileged to interview Taiwanese old-generation contemporary painter and installation artist, Tsong Pu. Teacher Tsong doesn’t speak English (actually, he does have a grasp of a little English but not enough to conduct an interview), so his friend, Taiwanese artist agent Lawrence Chuang, attended the interview as translator. I was a little nervous as I’ve never conducted an interview with translator before and wasn’t sure how the interview would flow. It turns out Tsong Pu is very amiable.

Tsong Pu, 'One Comes from Emptiness' 2009. Image courtesy of the artist.

Tsong Pu, 'One Comes from Emptiness' 2009. Image courtesy of the artist.

Tsong Pu has an incredibly engaging presence – the rhythm of his speech is enrapturing. Even though he was speaking Chinese and I couldn’t understand a word of it, I couldn’t help but listen intently to what he was saying. It made me desperately wish I could speak his language. I was lucky enough to conduct the interview in his studio in the Da’an district of Taipei City (he has two studios; the other is in the mountains on the edges of the city) where I could view some of his newest paintings as well as early pieces and installation models. Interviewing artists in their place of work is invaluable – you immediately have a better understanding of their process.

Unfortunately, I ran out of time to get to his current exhibition, on at TFAM, and was also unable to visit the Taipei gallery Tsong Pu founded with others 20 years ago, IT Park. I hope to get up to Taipei in the near future to make these visits.

I came away from the interview feeling genuinely privileged to have spoken with such an influential Taiwanese artist. I could have talked with him for hours more, there is just so much to explore in his thirty-odd year career that one and a half hours just didn’t do it justice. Well, there was an offer of drinking, dinner and crashing at his studio for the night, so there’s always next time.

Keep an eye on Art Radar Asia for my interview and Soundslide with Tsong Pu – up there in a couple of weeks.

Read more of my stories on contemporary Asian art on Art Radar Asia.

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JoB likes: HAND-DRAWN HILARIOUSNESS

May 4, 2010

A most super talented friend of mine, Katrin Hagen, currently living in Berlin, has put together a collection of her drawings on this website.

They are very, very funny in both a silly and smart way. I visit often to ensure a constant dose of strangeness. You should, too.

Among my favourites are In My Dreams, Deer and Beautiful Hat.

Mischief Champion is ordered by the month in which the sketches were produced and is updated with new work often.

source

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JoB likes: MILLY SLEEPING

April 22, 2010

Um, yeah. I am souper douper excited.

I just recieved a wonderful email informing me that one of my favourite Melbourne clothing boutiques, Milly Sleeping, has started an online store.

You can find things like this there.

Milly Sleeping is located in the inner city suburb of Carlton in Melbourne Australia and stocks clothing and accessories by independent and innovative New Zealand and Australian designers.

“… This Carlton boutique has developed a reputation for its carefully curated collection of the more cerebral local labels…” Michelle Griffin for The Age

Now my only worry is my potentially steadily declining bank balance.

I’ve just emailed them to see if they ship overseas but I’m sure they would. They just have to.

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JoB likes: MOVING HOUSE

April 6, 2010

While nearly everyone I know was at Spring Scream this weekend, I moved house. Moving house in Taiwan is so easy compared with back home. Where it would take a week to get your internet hooked up in New Zealand, in Taiwan you move in and two hours later a lovely man from a local internet company is there with a ton of cables. A most lovely friend found a truck for us and a kindly gentlemen to drive it and it only took one truckload to haul our stuff from one place to the other. So overall, the move was painless.

Here’s some pics I took of the apartment. Still got lots of work to do but the main stuff is done.

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JoB likes: HUNTING FOR WATERFALLS

March 30, 2010

I had spent most of Sunday morning studying Chinese, so by the time 3pm rolled around I was ready to road trip it to the mountains for some fresh air and greenery.

I found this video on YouTube about a waterfall supposedly 30 minutes outside Taichung City, called Siannyu Waterfall. My boyfriend and I decided we must find it as summer is just around the corner and it would be great to have a place to swim and escape the crazy Taiwanese summer heat.

So… off we went.

The Bat Hole (Toubiankeng Bat Cave) – a series of very narrow caves that you can climb through. We didn’t go into the caves because we didn’t have a torch and my shoes were too precious to me to risk them being covered in bat s*&t, but we’ll go back another time better equipped.

Some locals were swimming in a large waterhole in the river below the caves. One kid was contemplating jumping from the cliff into the water  but he backed out in the end.

Carrying on down the road we saw this sign. We were on our way!

Plantations of fruit trees and betelnut palms covered the hills either side of the road. Each piece of fruit was individually wrapped in a white paper bag, giving the hillsides a polka dot pattern that you can’t really appreciate in this photo.

We made a quick detour from the task at hand to climb the hill and check out the view. Amazing!

Found it! After a dodgy drive down a crazily small and ill-kept road we finally found the start of the waterfall. Very remote and surrounded by amazingly steep mountain peaks.

There are tons of potential swimming spots downstream from the start of the waterfall.

A secretive cafe just up from the waterfall, filled with pottery casks of… something. We didn’t try it out this time but it looks like the perfect place to relax post-swim. Bring on summer!

How to get there: Take Highway 136 from Taichung City and follow the Siannyu Waterfall signs. They’ll take you past the Toubiankeng Bat Cave. The waterfall is in the Taiping Wine Cask Mountain area. The drive should take you between 30 – 50 minutes, depending on which part of Taichung you are coming from and how comfortable your scooter seat is.

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JoB likes: THOUGHT-PROVOKING JEWELLERY

February 2, 2010

Not just adornment by Melbourne maker Natalia M.P.

An old friend of mine in Melbourne designs the most wayward, thought-provoking and subtle jewellery. I noticed she has recently created some new stuff for an exhibition at GAFFA in Sydney and had to post it here. I want it all so bad!

source

Check out NATALIA M.P for more images of her work. I’m not sure if she would make to order or send items overseas but I’m sure she wouldn’t mind you dropping her a line.

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JoB likes: FREE PUBLIC TRANSPORT

January 19, 2010

Taichung City have set up TTJ (or Taichung Traffic Jam) Bus, supplying five free bus routes to various areas of the city.

I assume this is to try and relieve some of the congestion by encouraging more people to get off their scooters and cars and onto public transport. I recently travelled on the Blue Line (#58) and the Yellow Line (#56).

You can pick up a map of the routes (in Chinese only) at the Taichung Train Station information centre or click here for an online version. You can find a useful English outline of the major stops for each route here.

I used this system to catch a ride to Viewpoints and Viewing Points, the 2009 Asian Art Biennale exhibition currently showing at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts. You can read my ramblings on the exhibition here.

TTJ Bus routes map

source

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